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Coinbase to Pursue Decentralized Form of Identification Following Acquisition /r/Bitcoin

Coinbase to Pursue Decentralized Form of Identification Following Acquisition /Bitcoin submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

CoinBase requires me to send them a picture of my ID. Why can't I purchase and sell bitcoins without identification?

It is more about, why should I send a random company called coinbase my ID? I don't even know them.
I would rather buy and sell bitcoins anonymously. Is there a wallet provider for this or an alternative parth?
submitted by WhoIsOBrien to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Coinbase] Identification Verify for Non US citizen in US /r/Bitcoin

[Coinbase] Identification Verify for Non US citizen in US /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

HELP with Coinbase identification issue! /r/Bitcoin

HELP with Coinbase identification issue! /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Question With CoinBase Identification Verification - WONT let me buy /r/Bitcoin

Question With CoinBase Identification Verification - WONT let me buy /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Why does coinbase need my identification? /r/Bitcoin

Why does coinbase need my identification? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Did the identification requirements for Coinbase change? /r/Bitcoin

Did the identification requirements for Coinbase change? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Trading Platform introduces candlestick pattern recognition, trend identification, Coinbase Exchange, OKCoin.com/.cn (spot trading only), BTCChina as well as 9 other exchanges.

Bitcoin Trading Platform introduces candlestick pattern recognition, trend identification, Coinbase Exchange, OKCoin.com/.cn (spot trading only), BTCChina as well as 9 other exchanges. submitted by daysofglory to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Industry news Coinbase incentivizes Bitcoin users identification

submitted by AndrewSaks to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Common sites with HIGHEST payout and STABLE income << 04/10/2020 >>

This is a long post, but please try to read it all and select the most suitable one for you. When you see any sites with good payout and good potential, feel free to create a post. Also when you know site that is scam, please create a post to alert everyone as soon as possible.

There're 4 main and common types of task you will encounter when using beermoney sites. You can use all the sites or just pick the most suitable type and site to work with. Using more than one site is recommended, as the number of tasks on one site is not high enough, and the tasks will not appear continuously.

I. MICRO-TASK (or Crowdsourcing task)

The task is vary from article assessment, information collection, search-query classification/answer relevance, taking or collecting photo/video, to object identification,... The number of tasks will increase as you complete tasks.
Pros:
- The number of tasks is higher and more stable than other type of beermoney.
- The payout is appropriate to your time and effort. You can even make stable income with them.
Cons:
- Sometime you will need to pass the training test to access the task.
- Your work may not be accepted if it does not meet the guideline.
- It can be a little hard in the beginning, there're also not many tasks for you, but BE PATIENT, because they haven't been able to fully assess your ability yet.
1-Toloka Yandex:
This is one of my favorite micro task sites, and is the first on the list when I make beermoney site suggestion.
The tasks are mainly in English and Russian. They also have task in your mother language too, depend on your setting and location. Don't worry about the language, as you can easily have it to be translated with google translate extension or any translation site and the task is easy enough to understand.
The minimum withdrawal is $0.02 if you request to withdrawal once a week, and it will be $1 if more than once a week. You can withdraw the money to PayPal, Payoneer, Skrill or papara. But to be able to withdraw with PayPal, you will need a verified PayPal account.
Here are registration links: ref-link and no-ref
2-Clickworker:
One of the most popular micro task sites, you can find many recommendations and good reputation about them. But to make the most if it, you will need to unlock UHRS, as describe here.
You definitely shouldn't miss Clickworker and UHRS. Their payout rate is higher than Toloka, but be careful that you'll be considered as spam if you complete the task too fast. Depend on your location and language, you can earn a great amount of money here, the highest I've earned in 1 day is $35.
You can receive payment to PayPal account with the minimum of €5. You can choose other payment methods too, like SEPA transfers and Transferwise.
No need to say anymore, here are the links: ref-link and no-ref
3-Remotasks
You will need to take part in training (which is quite hard and time-consuming) and pass the test to be able to access a large number of tasks here. The tasks are categorization, text highlighting, image annotation, semantic segmentation,... and well-known Lidar Annotation and Segmentation.
Here are registration links: ref-link and no-ref

NOTE FOR MICRO-TASK:
  1. It's highly recommended to use all those sites, and maybe other sites if you want, because the tasks are not shown continuously.
  2. Make sure to fully understand the guideline, as you will not be credited if you work fails to meet the requirement, which will waste your time and effort.
  3. If you find any task with really low credit but require a lot of time and effort, don't do it. If the requester still be able to find worker, they will always offer that price. It's not worth your time, just going to other tasks or going to other sites to see if there're any available tasks for you.

II. OFFER WALL TASK

Another way to earn beermoney online is to complete Offer wall tasks. You will be asked to installing app on your smartphone, signing up, playing game and reaching determined level, or watching video,.... Doing survey can also be listed here, but it will be shown in separate section.
There're many offer walls for you to choose, with different payout level. Usually each beermoney site will list many offer walls, one offer can appear in more than one site/wall, so make sure to surf around and compare the credit to find the best and highest payout wall/site for that offer.
Pros:
- Easy to do
- Can complete offer many times if you have different kinds of phone (mostly Android and iOS), or using another phone as the tasks are listed on many different offer walls.
- Can earn money while playing and relaxing, as mostly the offered apps are games. Some apps only requires you to install and open, make it really quick to have some beermoney.
Cons:
- The payout is not very high. Especially when that offer is going through many walls and sites to reach you.
- Some offer take much time to complete.
- The number of offers is not high enough to do daily.
1-RewardXP
RewardXP has surpassed GG2U to become the highest payout site. They have leveling system, the higher level you reach, the more offer walls you can access and the more benefit you can get.
With the minimum of $5, they provide a variety of withdrawal methods for you to choose, like PayPal, Amazon, Steam,...
You definitely should try this site. Here are your registration links: ref-link and no-ref. Registration with referral link, you will be given a 5000XP (~$0.5) bonus.
2-GG2U:
This is also my favorite site. Their paying rate is one of the highest in the market (if you find any other site which is higher, feel free to suggest :D THE HIGHEST ONE NOW is RewardXP, see above). Aside from installing and registering app, they also have many survey walls for you.
The most attractive part is that they will give you $1 bonus right after signing up, and after 5 withdrawal requests, you will have a chance to earn up to $7 bonus. With bonus, it's hard to say which is better, RewardXP or GG2U.
You can withdraw money to your PayPal account or Coinbase (crypto wallet), with the minimum of $7.
Here are your links: ref-link and no-ref
3-Cointiply
One of the most popular sites, with great community.
They will pay you with cryptocurrency like Bitcoin or Doge. You will have many chances to earn coins, by doing offer walls task, rolling the faucet every 1 hour, testing your luck with multiplier or by activating in their really crowded chat room.
You can also earn some coins by clicking Paid-to-click ads. Most of the time, those ads are from Cointiply user with their referral link embedded, so if you register sites when viewing those ads, they will earn some commission. You can try this strategy too :D
With their mobile app, it will be much easier to do mobile offers. Make sure to check your email and mobile app to get the user-limited Promotion Codes regularly.
Registration links: ref-link and no-ref
4-Swagbucks
Sometime you can earn money by spending less. Swagbucks offers a big number of sites where you can receive cash back when you shop online. If you shop online a lot, it's worth to take a look
Here are registration link for shopping: ref-link-shopping and no-ref-shopping
Beside the cash back program, Swagbucks also provides offer wall, however the paying rate is not as high as site 1 and 2 above. Anyway, if you want to try, here're your registration links: ref-link and no-ref
5-EarnCrypto
If you're into doing offer walls task and earning crypto currency, try this site too.
Their paying rate is quite lower than above sites, but they have Data entry task, which is daily, for you to earn some coins. By ranking high on their daily leader board, you will be rewarded with a great amount of coins (can even be higher than your earning from doing the data entry task itself :D).
There are many different kinds of crypto currency for you to select.
Just take a look if you have time: ref-link and no-ref
NOTE FOR OFFER WALL TASK:
  1. Every offer wall has a place to track your activity history, like what offer you clicked, what offer you completed and did you receive credit or not. Every time you're about to do an offer, after entering that offer (usually when you click an offer, a small panel about what offer is appears, there will be a button name 'continue' or 'go to offer', after you click that button, you're entering the offer), make sure that offer appears in your history tab of that offer wall. This will enable you to request support in case you complete the offer and have not received credit yet. If it does not appear in the history list, you will not be credited for that offer, so try to click it again.
  2. To find the history tab, after entering offer wall, you will need to find a button named 'My coin', 'My history', 'Support', or button with question mark,... That button should be easy to be found.
  3. Try to surf around to find the offer wall and site having the highest paying rate for the offer, as the same offer will appear in many offer walls and sites.
  4. When you're about to start to do an offer of installing app (especially game), try to read the comment in appstore/playstore to see whether the offer's requirements can be easily to fulfill or not. For example, the requirements are: 1. install game, 2. open it, 3. reach level 30; and you find some comment about cannot reach level 25, or it takes months to reach level 29, then skip that offer, it's not worth the try.

III. PAY TO SEARCH

You can earn nearly passive income from this type of task. They will give you some query, you will search with that query, entering determined site, leaving that site opened for couple of minutes.
Pros:
- It's super easy to do.
- While leaving the site open, you can do any other thing you want, like doing some micro-tasks.
- The paying rate is quite good, especially when you will not need to do much.
Cons:
- The number of queries is not very high.
1-SerpClix
In order to receive more queries to search, make sure to leave the site open and allow the notification.
Even though SerpClix recommends you to click on the page, don't do that, just using scrollbar. SerpClix will automatically navigate to sub page of that page. Another suggestion here is to install adblock extension, because SerpClix will ban you if you click on any ads on the page, so blocking them before hand is a good move.
Here your registration links: ref-link and no-ref

IV. SURVEY

Probably all offer walls have some kind of surveys there, some surveys are only available through offer walls, some have their own sites. By using their own sites will not guarantee that you will have higher payout though.
Make sure to be honest when doing survey, despite the fact that you will sometime be disqualified from the survey. There's many reasons why you are disqualified, like because your job is not suitable, your demography is not their target, your answer is not persistent,...
BE CAREFUL, they will keep track of you, even if you clear your cookie, so being dishonest can lead you to be banned from their sites. Again, BE HONEST, and there will be suitable surveys for you.
There will be two types of survey for you: the first one is filling form and selecting answer from their suggestion, the second one is to talk with them directly or via Video call apps. The second one has much much higher earning but the requirement is also higher too.
Pros:
- Easy to do, just being honest
- High payout, especially with the second type of survey.
- Some survey only need 5 minutes to complete with good payout.
Cons:
- Some survey can take about 30 minutes to complete, so make sure that you have enough free time.
- You will be disqualified if your information is not suitable to their survey's target. BUT ALWAYS BE HONEST.
1-SurveyTime
One of the best sites out there, my favorite one. They will instantly send you $1 or $0.5 (depend on survey) to your PayPal or Coinbase account when you complete the survey, so no minimum required to withdrawal. The survey you will do here is the first type, filling in the form and selecting answer.
You can register with SurveyTime through some offer walls, as they will give you some more coins when you complete the survey, but make sure to check their's conditions.
Make sure to turn on Browser notification and Email notification so that you don't miss any survey.
Registration links: no-ref
2-Respondent
You will need a microphone and/or webcam (built-in or external) as the survey in Respondent is conducted via video calls, phone calls, in-person discussions. Of course, you will receive a huge credit for doing survey here, from $5 up-to $1000. This's a great deal, one successful survey can get you more credit than doing hundreds of micro-tasks. Don't miss this site.
They will recommend suitable survey for you, but if you want to view all available survey, make sure to uncheck the 'Recommended' option in Filter panel.
Here're your registration links: ref-link and no-ref
NOTE FOR SURVEY TASK:
  1. sometime, they will provide the must-select answer in the question to test if your attention. Make sure to read the question carefully. For example, the question is "Do you agree that 1 + 1 = 2? Select option [I do not agree] in the answer", if you select [I agree], you fail.
  2. BE CAREFUL - BE HONEST
  3. When you're doing the first type survey (filling form, selecting answer), be careful not to install any app, or download any thing, or upload your social data file when asked. In that case, just contact survey site support and report it.
  4. It's better to use many different survey sites to maximum the number of surveys you receive.

Last word, BE PATIENT - earning online can be a little hard in the beginning.

Feel free to share your experience when using beermoney sites (and your referral link too :D) or ask question about any beermoney sites by creating new post. Also creating new post when you know that any site is scam or becomes scam.

P.S 1: In case you need a Crypto wallet, you can use Coinbase, registration links: ref-link and no-ref, or Binance ref-link and no-ref. You can read here for the comparison between Coibase and Binance
P.S 2: You can add some email addresses to PayPal account, so you can use many email address to register to beermoney sites if you want
P.S 3: If you're confident with your English, and have a computer, microphone and webcam, you can try Usertesting site, you will visit a website that requires you to test, talk about your experience of using that site
Here is the link: no-ref
submitted by trihai3012 to beermoneyASEAN [link] [comments]

All you need to know about Yield Farming - The rocket fuel for Defi

All you need to know about Yield Farming - The rocket fuel for Defi
Source
It’s effectively July 2017 in the world of decentralized finance (DeFi), and as in the heady days of the initial coin offering (ICO) boom, the numbers are only trending up.
According to DeFi Pulse, there is $1.9 billion in crypto assets locked in DeFi right now. According to the CoinDesk ICO Tracker, the ICO market started chugging past $1 billion in July 2017, just a few months before token sales started getting talked about on TV.
Debate juxtaposing these numbers if you like, but what no one can question is this: Crypto users are putting more and more value to work in DeFi applications, driven largely by the introduction of a whole new yield-generating pasture, Compound’s COMP governance token.
Governance tokens enable users to vote on the future of decentralized protocols, sure, but they also present fresh ways for DeFi founders to entice assets onto their platforms.
That said, it’s the crypto liquidity providers who are the stars of the present moment. They even have a meme-worthy name: yield farmers.

https://preview.redd.it/lxsvazp1g9l51.png?width=775&format=png&auto=webp&s=a36173ab679c701a5d5e0aac806c00fcc84d78c1

Where it started

Ethereum-based credit market Compound started distributing its governance token, COMP, to the protocol’s users this past June 15. Demand for the token (heightened by the way its automatic distribution was structured) kicked off the present craze and moved Compound into the leading position in DeFi.
The hot new term in crypto is “yield farming,” a shorthand for clever strategies where putting crypto temporarily at the disposal of some startup’s application earns its owner more cryptocurrency.
Another term floating about is “liquidity mining.”
The buzz around these concepts has evolved into a low rumble as more and more people get interested.
The casual crypto observer who only pops into the market when activity heats up might be starting to get faint vibes that something is happening right now. Take our word for it: Yield farming is the source of those vibes.
But if all these terms (“DeFi,” “liquidity mining,” “yield farming”) are so much Greek to you, fear not. We’re here to catch you up. We’ll get into all of them.
We’re going to go from very basic to more advanced, so feel free to skip ahead.

What are tokens?

Most CoinDesk readers probably know this, but just in case: Tokens are like the money video-game players earn while fighting monsters, money they can use to buy gear or weapons in the universe of their favorite game.
But with blockchains, tokens aren’t limited to only one massively multiplayer online money game. They can be earned in one and used in lots of others. They usually represent either ownership in something (like a piece of a Uniswap liquidity pool, which we will get into later) or access to some service. For example, in the Brave browser, ads can only be bought using basic attention token (BAT).
If tokens are worth money, then you can bank with them or at least do things that look very much like banking. Thus: decentralized finance.
Tokens proved to be the big use case for Ethereum, the second-biggest blockchain in the world. The term of art here is “ERC-20 tokens,” which refers to a software standard that allows token creators to write rules for them. Tokens can be used a few ways. Often, they are used as a form of money within a set of applications. So the idea for Kin was to create a token that web users could spend with each other at such tiny amounts that it would almost feel like they weren’t spending anything; that is, money for the internet.
Governance tokens are different. They are not like a token at a video-game arcade, as so many tokens were described in the past. They work more like certificates to serve in an ever-changing legislature in that they give holders the right to vote on changes to a protocol.
So on the platform that proved DeFi could fly, MakerDAO, holders of its governance token, MKR, vote almost every week on small changes to parameters that govern how much it costs to borrow and how much savers earn, and so on.
Read more: Why DeFi’s Billion-Dollar Milestone Matters
One thing all crypto tokens have in common, though, is they are tradable and they have a price. So, if tokens are worth money, then you can bank with them or at least do things that look very much like banking. Thus: decentralized finance.

What is DeFi?

Fair question. For folks who tuned out for a bit in 2018, we used to call this “open finance.” That construction seems to have faded, though, and “DeFi” is the new lingo.
In case that doesn’t jog your memory, DeFi is all the things that let you play with money, and the only identification you need is a crypto wallet.
On the normal web, you can’t buy a blender without giving the site owner enough data to learn your whole life history. In DeFi, you can borrow money without anyone even asking for your name.
I can explain this but nothing really brings it home like trying one of these applications. If you have an Ethereum wallet that has even $20 worth of crypto in it, go do something on one of these products. Pop over to Uniswap and buy yourself some FUN (a token for gambling apps) or WBTC (wrapped bitcoin). Go to MakerDAO and create $5 worth of DAI (a stablecoin that tends to be worth $1) out of the digital ether. Go to Compound and borrow $10 in USDC.
(Notice the very small amounts I’m suggesting. The old crypto saying “don’t put in more than you can afford to lose” goes double for DeFi. This stuff is uber-complex and a lot can go wrong. These may be “savings” products but they’re not for your retirement savings.)
Immature and experimental though it may be, the technology’s implications are staggering. On the normal web, you can’t buy a blender without giving the site owner enough data to learn your whole life history. In DeFi, you can borrow money without anyone even asking for your name.
DeFi applications don’t worry about trusting you because they have the collateral you put up to back your debt (on Compound, for instance, a $10 debt will require around $20 in collateral).
Read more: There Are More DAI on Compound Now Than There Are DAI in the World
If you do take this advice and try something, note that you can swap all these things back as soon as you’ve taken them out. Open the loan and close it 10 minutes later. It’s fine. Fair warning: It might cost you a tiny bit in fees, and the cost of using Ethereum itself right now is much higher than usual, in part due to this fresh new activity. But it’s nothing that should ruin a crypto user.
So what’s the point of borrowing for people who already have the money? Most people do it for some kind of trade. The most obvious example, to short a token (the act of profiting if its price falls). It’s also good for someone who wants to hold onto a token but still play the market.

Doesn’t running a bank take a lot of money up front?

It does, and in DeFi that money is largely provided by strangers on the internet. That’s why the startups behind these decentralized banking applications come up with clever ways to attract HODLers with idle assets.
Liquidity is the chief concern of all these different products. That is: How much money do they have locked in their smart contracts?
“In some types of products, the product experience gets much better if you have liquidity. Instead of borrowing from VCs or debt investors, you borrow from your users,” said Electric Capital managing partner Avichal Garg.
Let’s take Uniswap as an example. Uniswap is an “automated market maker,” or AMM (another DeFi term of art). This means Uniswap is a robot on the internet that is always willing to buy and it’s also always willing to sell any cryptocurrency for which it has a market.
On Uniswap, there is at least one market pair for almost any token on Ethereum. Behind the scenes, this means Uniswap can make it look like it is making a direct trade for any two tokens, which makes it easy for users, but it’s all built around pools of two tokens. And all these market pairs work better with bigger pools.

Why do I keep hearing about ‘pools’?

To illustrate why more money helps, let’s break down how Uniswap works.
Let’s say there was a market for USDC and DAI. These are two tokens (both stablecoins but with different mechanisms for retaining their value) that are meant to be worth $1 each all the time, and that generally tends to be true for both.
The price Uniswap shows for each token in any pooled market pair is based on the balance of each in the pool. So, simplifying this a lot for illustration’s sake, if someone were to set up a USDC/DAI pool, they should deposit equal amounts of both. In a pool with only 2 USDC and 2 DAI it would offer a price of 1 USDC for 1 DAI. But then imagine that someone put in 1 DAI and took out 1 USDC. Then the pool would have 1 USDC and 3 DAI. The pool would be very out of whack. A savvy investor could make an easy $0.50 profit by putting in 1 USDC and receiving 1.5 DAI. That’s a 50% arbitrage profit, and that’s the problem with limited liquidity.
(Incidentally, this is why Uniswap’s prices tend to be accurate, because traders watch it for small discrepancies from the wider market and trade them away for arbitrage profits very quickly.)
Read more: Uniswap V2 Launches With More Token-Swap Pairs, Oracle Service, Flash Loans
However, if there were 500,000 USDC and 500,000 DAI in the pool, a trade of 1 DAI for 1 USDC would have a negligible impact on the relative price. That’s why liquidity is helpful.
You can stick your assets on Compound and earn a little yield. But that’s not very creative. Users who look for angles to maximize that yield: those are the yield farmers.
Similar effects hold across DeFi, so markets want more liquidity. Uniswap solves this by charging a tiny fee on every trade. It does this by shaving off a little bit from each trade and leaving that in the pool (so one DAI would actually trade for 0.997 USDC, after the fee, growing the overall pool by 0.003 USDC). This benefits liquidity providers because when someone puts liquidity in the pool they own a share of the pool. If there has been lots of trading in that pool, it has earned a lot of fees, and the value of each share will grow.
And this brings us back to tokens.
Liquidity added to Uniswap is represented by a token, not an account. So there’s no ledger saying, “Bob owns 0.000000678% of the DAI/USDC pool.” Bob just has a token in his wallet. And Bob doesn’t have to keep that token. He could sell it. Or use it in another product. We’ll circle back to this, but it helps to explain why people like to talk about DeFi products as “money Legos.”

So how much money do people make by putting money into these products?

It can be a lot more lucrative than putting money in a traditional bank, and that’s before startups started handing out governance tokens.
Compound is the current darling of this space, so let’s use it as an illustration. As of this writing, a person can put USDC into Compound and earn 2.72% on it. They can put tether (USDT) into it and earn 2.11%. Most U.S. bank accounts earn less than 0.1% these days, which is close enough to nothing.
However, there are some caveats. First, there’s a reason the interest rates are so much juicier: DeFi is a far riskier place to park your money. There’s no Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) protecting these funds. If there were a run on Compound, users could find themselves unable to withdraw their funds when they wanted.
Plus, the interest is quite variable. You don’t know what you’ll earn over the course of a year. USDC’s rate is high right now. It was low last week. Usually, it hovers somewhere in the 1% range.
Similarly, a user might get tempted by assets with more lucrative yields like USDT, which typically has a much higher interest rate than USDC. (Monday morning, the reverse was true, for unclear reasons; this is crypto, remember.) The trade-off here is USDT’s transparency about the real-world dollars it’s supposed to hold in a real-world bank is not nearly up to par with USDC’s. A difference in interest rates is often the market’s way of telling you the one instrument is viewed as dicier than another.
Users making big bets on these products turn to companies Opyn and Nexus Mutual to insure their positions because there’s no government protections in this nascent space – more on the ample risks later on.
So users can stick their assets in Compound or Uniswap and earn a little yield. But that’s not very creative. Users who look for angles to maximize that yield: those are the yield farmers.

OK, I already knew all of that. What is yield farming?

Broadly, yield farming is any effort to put crypto assets to work and generate the most returns possible on those assets.
At the simplest level, a yield farmer might move assets around within Compound, constantly chasing whichever pool is offering the best APY from week to week. This might mean moving into riskier pools from time to time, but a yield farmer can handle risk.
“Farming opens up new price arbs [arbitrage] that can spill over to other protocols whose tokens are in the pool,” said Maya Zehavi, a blockchain consultant.
Because these positions are tokenized, though, they can go further.
This was a brand-new kind of yield on a deposit. In fact, it was a way to earn a yield on a loan. Who has ever heard of a borrower earning a return on a debt from their lender?
In a simple example, a yield farmer might put 100,000 USDT into Compound. They will get a token back for that stake, called cUSDT. Let’s say they get 100,000 cUSDT back (the formula on Compound is crazy so it’s not 1:1 like that but it doesn’t matter for our purposes here).
They can then take that cUSDT and put it into a liquidity pool that takes cUSDT on Balancer, an AMM that allows users to set up self-rebalancing crypto index funds. In normal times, this could earn a small amount more in transaction fees. This is the basic idea of yield farming. The user looks for edge cases in the system to eke out as much yield as they can across as many products as it will work on.
Right now, however, things are not normal, and they probably won’t be for a while.

Why is yield farming so hot right now?

Because of liquidity mining. Liquidity mining supercharges yield farming.
Liquidity mining is when a yield farmer gets a new token as well as the usual return (that’s the “mining” part) in exchange for the farmer’s liquidity.
“The idea is that stimulating usage of the platform increases the value of the token, thereby creating a positive usage loop to attract users,” said Richard Ma of smart-contract auditor Quantstamp.
The yield farming examples above are only farming yield off the normal operations of different platforms. Supply liquidity to Compound or Uniswap and get a little cut of the business that runs over the protocols – very vanilla.
But Compound announced earlier this year it wanted to truly decentralize the product and it wanted to give a good amount of ownership to the people who made it popular by using it. That ownership would take the form of the COMP token.
Lest this sound too altruistic, keep in mind that the people who created it (the team and the investors) owned more than half of the equity. By giving away a healthy proportion to users, that was very likely to make it a much more popular place for lending. In turn, that would make everyone’s stake worth much more.
So, Compound announced this four-year period where the protocol would give out COMP tokens to users, a fixed amount every day until it was gone. These COMP tokens control the protocol, just as shareholders ultimately control publicly traded companies.
Every day, the Compound protocol looks at everyone who had lent money to the application and who had borrowed from it and gives them COMP proportional to their share of the day’s total business.
The results were very surprising, even to Compound’s biggest promoters.
COMP’s value will likely go down, and that’s why some investors are rushing to earn as much of it as they can right now.
This was a brand-new kind of yield on a deposit into Compound. In fact, it was a way to earn a yield on a loan, as well, which is very weird: Who has ever heard of a borrower earning a return on a debt from their lender?
COMP’s value has consistently been well over $200 since it started distributing on June 15. We did the math elsewhere but long story short: investors with fairly deep pockets can make a strong gain maximizing their daily returns in COMP. It is, in a way, free money.
It’s possible to lend to Compound, borrow from it, deposit what you borrowed and so on. This can be done multiple times and DeFi startup Instadapp even built a tool to make it as capital-efficient as possible.
“Yield farmers are extremely creative. They find ways to ‘stack’ yields and even earn multiple governance tokens at once,” said Spencer Noon of DTC Capital.
COMP’s value spike is a temporary situation. The COMP distribution will only last four years and then there won’t be any more. Further, most people agree that the high price now is driven by the low float (that is, how much COMP is actually free to trade on the market – it will never be this low again). So the value will probably gradually go down, and that’s why savvy investors are trying to earn as much as they can now.
Appealing to the speculative instincts of diehard crypto traders has proven to be a great way to increase liquidity on Compound. This fattens some pockets but also improves the user experience for all kinds of Compound users, including those who would use it whether they were going to earn COMP or not.
As usual in crypto, when entrepreneurs see something successful, they imitate it. Balancer was the next protocol to start distributing a governance token, BAL, to liquidity providers. Flash loan provider bZx has announced a plan. Ren, Curve and Synthetix also teamed up to promote a liquidity pool on Curve.
It is a fair bet many of the more well-known DeFi projects will announce some kind of coin that can be mined by providing liquidity.
The case to watch here is Uniswap versus Balancer. Balancer can do the same thing Uniswap does, but most users who want to do a quick token trade through their wallet use Uniswap. It will be interesting to see if Balancer’s BAL token convinces Uniswap’s liquidity providers to defect.
So far, though, more liquidity has gone into Uniswap since the BAL announcement, according to its data site. That said, even more has gone into Balancer.

Did liquidity mining start with COMP?

No, but it was the most-used protocol with the most carefully designed liquidity mining scheme.
This point is debated but the origins of liquidity mining probably date back to Fcoin, a Chinese exchange that created a token in 2018 that rewarded people for making trades. You won’t believe what happened next! Just kidding, you will: People just started running bots to do pointless trades with themselves to earn the token.
Similarly, EOS is a blockchain where transactions are basically free, but since nothing is really free the absence of friction was an invitation for spam. Some malicious hacker who didn’t like EOS created a token called EIDOS on the network in late 2019. It rewarded people for tons of pointless transactions and somehow got an exchange listing.
These initiatives illustrated how quickly crypto users respond to incentives.
Read more: Compound Changes COMP Distribution Rules Following ‘Yield Farming’ Frenzy
Fcoin aside, liquidity mining as we now know it first showed up on Ethereum when the marketplace for synthetic tokens, Synthetix, announced in July 2019 an award in its SNX token for users who helped add liquidity to the sETH/ETH pool on Uniswap. By October, that was one of Uniswap’s biggest pools.
When Compound Labs, the company that launched the Compound protocol, decided to create COMP, the governance token, the firm took months designing just what kind of behavior it wanted and how to incentivize it. Even still, Compound Labs was surprised by the response. It led to unintended consequences such as crowding into a previously unpopular market (lending and borrowing BAT) in order to mine as much COMP as possible.
Just last week, 115 different COMP wallet addresses – senators in Compound’s ever-changing legislature – voted to change the distribution mechanism in hopes of spreading liquidity out across the markets again.

Is there DeFi for bitcoin?

Yes, on Ethereum.
Nothing has beaten bitcoin over time for returns, but there’s one thing bitcoin can’t do on its own: create more bitcoin.
A smart trader can get in and out of bitcoin and dollars in a way that will earn them more bitcoin, but this is tedious and risky. It takes a certain kind of person.
DeFi, however, offers ways to grow one’s bitcoin holdings – though somewhat indirectly.
A long HODLer is happy to gain fresh BTC off their counterparty’s short-term win. That’s the game.
For example, a user can create a simulated bitcoin on Ethereum using BitGo’s WBTC system. They put BTC in and get the same amount back out in freshly minted WBTC. WBTC can be traded back for BTC at any time, so it tends to be worth the same as BTC.
Then the user can take that WBTC, stake it on Compound and earn a few percent each year in yield on their BTC. Odds are, the people who borrow that WBTC are probably doing it to short BTC (that is, they will sell it immediately, buy it back when the price goes down, close the loan and keep the difference).
A long HODLer is happy to gain fresh BTC off their counterparty’s short-term win. That’s the game.

How risky is it?

Enough.
“DeFi, with the combination of an assortment of digital funds, automation of key processes, and more complex incentive structures that work across protocols – each with their own rapidly changing tech and governance practices – make for new types of security risks,” said Liz Steininger of Least Authority, a crypto security auditor. “Yet, despite these risks, the high yields are undeniably attractive to draw more users.”
We’ve seen big failures in DeFi products. MakerDAO had one so bad this year it’s called “Black Thursday.” There was also the exploit against flash loan provider bZx. These things do break and when they do money gets taken.
As this sector gets more robust, we could see token holders greenlighting more ways for investors to profit from DeFi niches.
Right now, the deal is too good for certain funds to resist, so they are moving a lot of money into these protocols to liquidity mine all the new governance tokens they can. But the funds – entities that pool the resources of typically well-to-do crypto investors – are also hedging. Nexus Mutual, a DeFi insurance provider of sorts, told CoinDesk it has maxed out its available coverage on these liquidity applications. Opyn, the trustless derivatives maker, created a way to short COMP, just in case this game comes to naught.
And weird things have arisen. For example, there’s currently more DAI on Compound than have been minted in the world. This makes sense once unpacked but it still feels dicey to everyone.
That said, distributing governance tokens might make things a lot less risky for startups, at least with regard to the money cops.
“Protocols distributing their tokens to the public, meaning that there’s a new secondary listing for SAFT tokens, [gives] plausible deniability from any security accusation,” Zehavi wrote. (The Simple Agreement for Future Tokens was a legal structure favored by many token issuers during the ICO craze.)
Whether a cryptocurrency is adequately decentralized has been a key feature of ICO settlements with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

What’s next for yield farming? (A prediction)

COMP turned out to be a bit of a surprise to the DeFi world, in technical ways and others. It has inspired a wave of new thinking.
“Other projects are working on similar things,” said Nexus Mutual founder Hugh Karp. In fact, informed sources tell CoinDesk brand-new projects will launch with these models.
We might soon see more prosaic yield farming applications. For example, forms of profit-sharing that reward certain kinds of behavior.
Imagine if COMP holders decided, for example, that the protocol needed more people to put money in and leave it there longer. The community could create a proposal that shaved off a little of each token’s yield and paid that portion out only to the tokens that were older than six months. It probably wouldn’t be much, but an investor with the right time horizon and risk profile might take it into consideration before making a withdrawal.
(There are precedents for this in traditional finance: A 10-year Treasury bond normally yields more than a one-month T-bill even though they’re both backed by the full faith and credit of Uncle Sam, a 12-month certificate of deposit pays higher interest than a checking account at the same bank, and so on.)
As this sector gets more robust, its architects will come up with ever more robust ways to optimize liquidity incentives in increasingly refined ways. We could see token holders greenlighting more ways for investors to profit from DeFi niches.
Questions abound for this nascent industry: What will MakerDAO do to restore its spot as the king of DeFi? Will Uniswap join the liquidity mining trend? Will anyone stick all these governance tokens into a decentralized autonomous organization (DAO)? Or would that be a yield farmers co-op?
Whatever happens, crypto’s yield farmers will keep moving fast. Some fresh fields may open and some may soon bear much less luscious fruit.
But that’s the nice thing about farming in DeFi: It is very easy to switch fields.
submitted by pascalbernoulli to Yield_Farming [link] [comments]

Building an Ethereum Mining Rig (13 GPU) - 4th part

Third update to the guide "Building a Mining Rig for Ethereum". The absolute first guide to building a RX Vega 64 8gb 13 GPU Mining Rig.
Reading this guide to building a 13 GPU Ethereum mining rig requires adequate knowledge of building and running an Ethereum Mining Rig. We therefore recommend a previous view of our Guide to build a Mining Rig and related updates.

Let's immediately list the hardware used:

- Asus Mining Master X370 mainboard
- Core i5 Coffee Lake CPU
- 480 or 500GB SSD
- 32Gb Ram
- 13 GPU RX Vega 64 8Gb
- 3 x 1000W power supplies
- 1 1200W power supply
- 8Gb USB stick

In this guide we will obviously not explain how to mount the hardware of a Rig. The only notes we wish to underline are the following:

- the 1200W power supply must be the primary one on which to connect 4 GPUs and the video output for the monitor

- all the risers, as well as obviously the GPUs, must be powered through the 8-pole connections of the power supplies. We strongly advise against the use of 6-pole ports. Therefore, have the appropriate number of cables available for all connections. Risers can also be powered in pairs.

- the model of the video card used is the Asus Rog Strixx Gaming RX Vega 64 8Gb


The operating system is Windows 10 updated to the latest version available. The tool for creating installation media is available at the following link https://www.microsoft.com/it-it/software-download/windows10 to be able to use the USB key as a launcher for installing Windows 10 .

With the Asus Mining Master, the GPU risers can be connected directly to the motherboard via the USB cable, thus making one of the small components of the riser kits unusable.

After making all the connections on the motherboard, check that all GPUs are highlighted in green when the PC starts up. If not, move the USB cable on the motherboard one position. It may take at least 2 or 3 attempts.

Ethereum mining with 13 GPUs
Having solved this possible small inconvenience, let's proceed with the installation of the AMD Adrenaline 2020 drivers, always updated to the latest version, relating to the RX Vega Series.

If you want to proceed with more caution, the advice is to disconnect all the GPUs (remembering the locations of the USB cables) except one before installing the drivers.

The mining will be carried out on the Ethermine pool, our favorite, using the Claymore 15 software.


Once the download is complete, you will have to unzip the folder on the desktop and open the start.bat file contained in the Claymore folder using Notepad. The procedure is the usual one: delete the content and copy-paste the following command string:

start config.dll -epool eu1.ethermine.org:14444 -ewal "your ETH wallet address" -epsw x -worker "worker"
EthDcrMiner64.exe

Where EthDcrMiner64.exe is the executable, -epool indicates the pool to mine and its port, -ewal is the wallet address and -epsw is the password that we leave blank (X).

In place of "your wallet address" you will have to put your Ethererum wallet and instead of worker you will enter an identification number in case you plan to build more RIGs (such as RIG1, RIG2, etc ...).

At the following link, many other useful commands for your Rig:
https://github.com/Claymore-Dual/Claymore-Dual-Miner

Try to run mining and check that the system is stable.

In the Payouts section, after a few minutes of mining, you can decide the minimum amount of Ether to be sent to your wallet by simply entering the IP address of the RIG.

We performed the mining directly on the Ethereum address of the Exodus wallet. Coinbase is not supported.

Overclocking with OverdriveNTool
Let's proceed now with the download of OverdrivenTool at the following link: https://forums.guru3d.com/threads/overdriventool-tool-for-amd-gpus.416116/


For those unfamiliar with it, we recommend reading our software guide.

For those who do not intend to experiment or do not completely trust their software experience, at the following link you can view the settings on the parameters of the GPUs and the RAM of the GPUs - and other small tricks - to obtain the best possible performance without forcing the cards too much. video.

On our Youtube channel (subscribe numerous !!!) you will now be able to see the video relating to the start of mining and the one concerning the stabilization phase.

To better cool the Rig we have also installed fans for the extraction of heat as caution is never too much. Moreover, there is also an aesthetic gain.

Conclusions on the guide to build a 13 gpu ethereum mining rig.
Finally, we conclude this guide by reporting what everyone was waiting for (we do not say how long we had to wait before obtaining this result) the video link complhttps: //www.youtube.com/watch? V = k53XZn3zc9I & t = 61seto del Rig e del Mining .

We remain available for any advice, both on pools, on yield and on consumption.

Feel free to contact us in case you run into any problems where our guide to Building a 13 GPU Ethereum Mining Rig has not been completely helpful.

See you soon.


If you liked this article and would like to contribute with a donation:

Bitcoin: 1Ld9b165ZYHZcY9eUQmL9UjwzcphRE5S8Z
Ethereum: 0x8D7E456A11f4D9bB9e6683A5ac52e7DB79DBbEE7
Litecoin: LamSRc1jmwgx5xwDgzZNoXYd6ENczUZViK
Stellar: GBLDIRIQWRZCN5IXPIKYFQOE46OG2SI7AFVWFSLAHK52MVYDGVJ6IXGI
Ripple: rUb8v4wbGWYrtXzUpj7TxCFfUWgfvym9xf

By: cryptoall.it
Telegram Channel: t.me/giulo75
Netbox Browser: https://netbox.global/PZn5A
Horizen Faucet: https://getzen.cash/auth/register?ref=153228
submitted by Giulo75 to u/Giulo75 [link] [comments]

Building an Ethereum Mining Rig - Part 2

First update to the guide "Building a 6Gpu Mining Rig for Ethereum" - Let's talk about Claymore.
This update supplements and does not replace the Guide to Build a 6GPU Mining Rig for Ethereum published on our site.

The substantial differences are due to the installation of the latest version of the Windows 10 Operating System, the mining on the Ethermine pool (in our opinion simpler than Dwarfpool) and the use of the XFX RX 580 8gb GPUs.

The first variant is found in Part 4 of the guide: the environment variables are not to be entered as they will be integrated directly into the bat file to start mining.

The second variant is found in Part 7 of the guide and leads us to "mine" on a different pool using the Claymore software.
Download the latest version at the following link: https://github.com/Claymore-Dual/Claymore-Dual-Miner

Once downloaded, unzip everything on a folder on your desktop and open the start.bat file with notepad. Clear the contents and copy the following command:

start config.dll -epool eu1.ethermine.org:14444 -ewal "your ETH wallet address" -epsw x -worker "worker"
EthDcrMiner64.exe

Where instead of "your wallet address" you will have to put your Ethererum wallet - obviously without the quotes - and instead of worker you will put an identification number in case you build more RIGs (such as RIG1, RIG2, etc ...). We opted for the eu1 pool even if some on the discussion forums believe that the us1 is more profitable.

At the following link, many other useful commands for your Rig:
https://github.com/Claymore-Dual/Claymore-Dual-Miner


The Ethermine pool offers a very well crafted and descriptive interface. In the Payouts section, after only 5 minutes of mining, you can decide the minimum amount of Ether to be transferred to your wallet by simply entering the IP address of the RIG.

We have decided to mine directly on the Ethereum address of our Exodus wallet. It is not recommended to mine directly on Coinbase, as reported on the site itself. Sin.

Nothing should be left to chance when you decide to build a mining rig for Ethereum.
The third variant is the most difficult of all. Once you have reached Part 5 of the guide, you can decide whether to continue or follow this update / variant. If you are here it is probably because you have run into some problem that the guide does not allow you to solve.

With the latest version of Windows 10, you may run into a kernel conflict between the operating system and AMD's Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition Beta for Blockchain Compute drivers. This conflict will prevent you from using Atiflash after installing the drivers.

Important: Before making any changes to the BIOS, please backup each GPU.

Important: first of all flash the GPUs with the original bios if for any reason you are forced to reinstall the operating system.


Still on Atiflash.
The advice would therefore be to flash the GPUs and then install the AMD drivers. Let's say it would be because you may run into another problem this time related to the GPUs themselves. Since each video card is different from any other, the bios mod of the GPU could crash the operating system showing the classic blue screen and displaying an error related to the Atimkdag.sys file.

This could be due to the fact that some GPUs have significantly higher performance in the calculation phase than others. We could call it a factory overclock but not using them for gaming we cannot say it with absolute certainty.

Having assessed these two drawbacks, the only safe solution is to flash all the GPUs, disconnect them except for the first one, install the Blockchain drivers (plus Atimkdag patch) and launch the mining command verifying that the operating system does not go into crash in the next 5 minutes.

Turn off the rig again and connect the second GPU so on up to the sixth. In the event that one or more video cards should crash the system, disconnect them. After that, it uses DDU from the provisional mode and flashes these GPUs with their original bios. At this point, connect them again, reinstall the Blockcain drivers (plus Atimkdag patch) and start mining definitively.

All the operations related to the use of Atiflash, DDU and driver installation are reported in Part 5 and Part 6 of our guide.
A little bit of Overclocking.
You will certainly find significant differences in performance between the GPUs.

At this point all that remains is to "operate" with an overclocking software. We opt for OverdriveNtool. Our constantly updated guide is available at the following link: https://www.cryptoall.it/2019/10/12/complete-guide-to-overdriventool/

Link to the official YouTube channel for verification: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdE9TTHAOtyKxy59rALSprA

GPUs with modified bios will not leave much room for modification. You will have to proceed with the most extreme overclocking on those that mount the original bios; obviously always in small steps by saving the profile for each GPU. Our guide explains in detail how to do it.

Hoping to have been of help, we give everyone an appointment for the second part of the update on how to build an Ethereum mining rig in which we will explain in detail the dual mining on the Ethermine pool.

See you soon.


If you liked this article and would like to contribute with a donation:

Bitcoin: 1Ld9b165ZYHZcY9eUQmL9UjwzcphRE5S8Z
Ethereum: 0x8D7E456A11f4D9bB9e6683A5ac52e7DB79DBbEE7
Litecoin: LamSRc1jmwgx5xwDgzZNoXYd6ENczUZViK
Stellar: GBLDIRIQWRZCN5IXPIKYFQOE46OG2SI7AFVWFSLAHK52MVYDGVJ6IXGI
Ripple: rUb8v4wbGWYrtXzUpj7TxCFfUWgfvym9xf

By: cryptoall.it Telegram Channel: t.me/giulo75 Netbox Browser: https://netbox.global/PZn5A
submitted by Giulo75 to u/Giulo75 [link] [comments]

Best BTC exchange platform. Perhaps one with decent ID validation.

I have been trying to purchase some Bitcoins for more than a month now, every exchange platform I register to is rejecting me and is not validating my documentation.
All of them ask me for a proof of address (even though my ID literally has the address on it and is valid) it seems like its not enough.
Unfrotuantly I have no other papers. I am a student who currently lives in Spain, i have a valid ID that indicates that and also my passport and relevant identifications.
Coinbase and kraken have said no. Cashapp which seems to be highly recommended does not work here. Bitstamp is still under process and is taking ages.
I currently trade bitcoin through Revolut (where i have a valid account) but thats just for trading, I dont actually own the bitcoins so i cant do much with that.
What other exchange platforms should I look into?
I have already set up my wallet on exodus, I just need to know how I can get bitcoins to go there.
How would you advice me to tackle this issue?
submitted by yaroshidi to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Summary of the new IRS guidelines (TLDR include)

Hey all - I know there's a dozen posts about the new crypto tax deadlines - so apologies for making it a dozen plus one.
Full disclosure, I work for Bitcoin.Tax, where this article was published. I've included the link to our summary, as well as our actual summary. Also - I'll be talking with a crypto tax pro on our podcast about these guidelines soon. I usually post links to our podcast on this subreddit, so stay tuned (if you want...) for that in the next few days. Hopefully this helps some folks, as parts of the new guidelines are fairly ambiguous.
Link: https://bitcoin.tax/blog/irs-crypto-tax-faq/
TLDR:
Generally, this is the same as the advice and common practice used by taxpayers and accountants. Although, the exception here is the clarification of the specific identification rule. We'll talk about that below.
Summary:
The IRS has issued their long-awaited guidance on the tax treatment for cryptocurrencies. You can read their FAQ On Virtual Currency Transactions on the IRS website.
This is the first official guidance since the original 2014-21 notice in April 2014.

IRS Cryptocurrency Tax FAQ

We have gone into more detail for some of the main points in their FAQ.

Hard forks and airdrops

Despite peculiar wording by the IRS, they have confirmed that receipt of crypto from an airdrop or fork is to be treated as income, and so subject to income tax.
ordinary income equal to the fair market value of the new cryptocurrency when it is received, which is when the transaction is recorded on the distributed ledger, provided you have dominion and control over the cryptocurrency so that you can transfer, sell, exchange, or otherwise dispose of the cryptocurrency
However, these drops typically have no market (perhaps a futures market) until they have existed for a period of time, so establishing a value could be difficult. It is possible that the value could be zero right at that exact moment it is recorded on the distributed ledger.
In order to receive income, you must have dominion and control over these new crypto. This effectively means you must be able to manage it; typically you would have the private keys or it is immediately available in a custodial wallet or online account, e.g. Coinbase.
If the crypto doesn't appear in your wallet, or you don't get control of it until a later date, then that later date is used to calculated the USD income value.
This had been a common question among crypto traders: if BTC was forked off into a new "BTC" coin, which you might not even have been aware of, do you still have income? The answer is no. Unless, you subsequently get access to those new coins, in which case you do have income on the date you receive control.
When you have income for an airdrop or fork, this also sets the cost basis (value and date) for any subsequent capital gains calculations.

Fair Market Value (FMV)

FMV is used to give something a value, i.e. what it's worth. If you list a bike for sale, you might research the prices for which other people are selling. Those prices give a FMV. But it you sell your bike and someone buys it for $100, then the bike's FMV was $100.
With crypto, sometimes we need to know FMV because we are not trading directly for dollars.
For example, if you sell 1 BTC for 150 LTC, you are disposing of the 1 BTC at FMV. You need to know the USD value in order to know the proceeds and to calculate any capital gains or losses.
So, first, if this was traded on an exchange, we use the spot price on the exchange at that time. This is true even if the transaction was off-chain.
However, where no FMV exists, such as a peer-to-peer transaction, then you have to get the value from elsewhere.
So, secondly, use the FMV of the service or product you are exchanging. With the above bike example, say buying it with crypto, the FMV would be that of the bike itself (the price it would have sold for USD).
Lastly, when no value can be obtained, then use a service that provides a consistent worldwide indices value (the IRS are calling this an "explorer" but that is a confusing term as blockchain explorers may not provide a USD value). If you do not use an "explorer" value, you can use an "accurate representation of the cryptocurrency's market value". Much like with fiat, this means using an establish and consistent source.

FIFO and Specific Identification

Advice from most tax preparers and accountants has been to err on the side of caution and go with First-In First-Out (FIFO). Basically, if you bought 1 BTC for $9,000 and later another for $10,000, when you come to sell 1 BTC (or partial) you would use the cost of the first 1 BTC that you had acquired.
This is the default IRS cost basis method and would not be challenged.
Some taxpayers had filed using specific identification, where FIFO was not used and instead the "lot" that was sold was chosen from their wallets. Summary strategies could also be employed, such as Last-In First-Out (LIFO), where the basis of the most recently acquired crypto is used instead.
These other strategies, such as last-in first-out, closest-cost or lowest-cost, often try to minimize the gains per transaction and defer them until later.
This is the biggest change in the new IRS guidance and confirms that specific identification can be used. However, you must be able to document this, which the IRS describes as:
You may identify a specific unit of virtual currency either by documenting the specific unit’s unique digital identifier such as a private key, public key, and address, or by records showing the transaction information for all units of a specific virtual currency, such as Bitcoin, held in a single account, wallet, or address.This information must show (1) the date and time each unit was acquired, (2) your basis and the fair market value of each unit at the time it was acquired, (3) the date and time each unit was sold, exchanged, or otherwise disposed of, and (4) the fair market value of each unit when sold, exchanged, or disposed of, and the amount of money or the value of property received for each unit.
There is no guidance if any extra information should be reported, but it is generally the same information that is added to the 8949 form where capital gains are reported.

Gifts and Donations

Similar to gifts of stocks or property, the rules regarding cost basis have remained unchanged. Received gifts are not immediate income but you do still recognize an capital gains income when you later come to sell, exchange or dispose of the cryptocurrency.
You can use the original basis (with documentation) from the giver in order to make use of long-term gains. However, your received basis becomes the lesser of the giver's cost basis and the FMV of the gift on the date you received it. This is to prevent from gifting losses. Also, if you do not have documentation showing the gift cost basis, then your basis is zero, i.e. you must declare 100% as capital gains.
Donations to registered charities do not recognize income, gains or losses. The value of your charitable donation is the FMV on the date of the gift if you have held the crypto for more than a year. For a year or less, it is lesser of the crypto's cost basis or its FMV on the day of the gift.

What was not mentioned

There are still some key questions and ambiguities that tax professionals have been looking for clarification. For instance, with hard forks and airdrops, if you have the private keys but no software, does that count as control?
Airdrop and forks generally have no markets when they are created, so is there a zero FMV? And should you take the value only when you exercise control?
Can specific identification be used at will or must it be done consistently?
Were 1031 "like-kind" exchanges ever a valid approach before 2018?

Guidance is retroactive

Finally, be aware that IRS guidance is always retroactive, unless otherwise stated, and so should be applied to past and future crypto transactions. If you have not followed these rules then you should consult with your tax professional and may need to file an amendment.
---

Edit:
According to BitcoinTaxesMe:
I clarified a couple of the not mentioned ones with the IRS verbally yesterday. This isn't official guidance, but some insight into what the IRS is thinking:
"For instance, with hard forks and airdrops, if you have the private keys but no software, does that count as control?"
If you the software exists and you don't install it, but could have, it's income, even if installation presents a security risk.
"Airdrop and forks generally have no markets when they are created, so is there a zero FMV? And should you take the value only when you exercise control?"
There's no income recognized until you both have control and there's a way to sell it. So there's no way to take a zero basis, as soon as a market appears it triggers the 2nd prong.
I personally think both of these are insane.
submitted by Sal-BitcoinTax to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Cash infrastructure tax

https://medium.com/@jiangzhuoeinfrastructure-funding-plan-for-bitcoin-cash-131fdcd2412e
Miscellaneous observations:
  1. Large Miners' ability to easily soft fork by themselves is a result of BCH having only a fraction of hashrate. Having a minority hashrate is not required, though: for example, a coin with 60% of hashrate could be 51% attacked by 31% hashrate. In other words, given the amount of mining centralization that exists, this problem could conceivably also affect BTC in the future.
  2. Obviously, this change is controversial. As such, highly invested miners have apparently shown a willingness to use their SHA256 hardware to execute a 51% attack. This might be evidence that Bitcoin's long term security model is basically broken. I'm sure some BTC people will dismiss this as a BCH-local problem but I feel like it's everyone's problem who uses SHA256.
  3. While the article proposes that any miners who are driven out of business will flock to BTC and drive up the hashrate, that might be an oversimplification, as some might be driven out of business entirely (further enriching miners of either coin who had large margins to begin with).
  4. As usual, BTC could theoretically avoid the incoming hashrate (and flood BCH with hashrate in the process) by changing PoW if it was considered a serious enough problem. (A similar skewing of "independent" miners to preferentially mine BTC probably already exists once existed because of ASICBOOST.)
  5. If some or all of the infrastructure tax went directly into the cartel's pockets, they could of course undercut all other miners.
  6. This post notes that a UASF could theoretically prevent such a MASF by banning multiple coinbase outputs. I'm not sure if it's that simple: imagine, for example, a scheme where all coinbases must directly pay Amaury Sechet, who then promises to reimburse 90% to the pool that mined the block. Banning pool identification strings doesn't work either: so long as mining pools can somehow encode information into blocks (for example, by manipulating the transaction set) for ~free, they can use that to secretly communicate their identity.
  7. Even Monero, which is typically much more secure against censorship than Bitcoin, isn't immune to this type of MASF because of view keys.
submitted by yamaha20 to BitcoinDiscussion [link] [comments]

Crypto-Currency: A Guide to Common Tax Situations

STATUS: Majority of questions have been answered. If yours got missed, please feel free to post it again.
Introduction
All,
Based on the rapid increase in popularity and price of bitcoin and other crypto currencies (particularly over the past year), I expect that lots of people have questions about how crypto currency will impact their taxes. This thread attempts to address several common issues. I'm posting similar versions of it here, in several major crypto subs, and eventually in the weekly "tax help" threads personalfinance runs.
I'd like to thank the /personalfinance mod team and the /tax community for their help with this thread and especially for reading earlier versions and offering several valuable suggestions/corrections.
This thread is NOT an endorsement of crypto currency as an investing strategy. There is a time and a place to debate the appropriateness of crypto as part of a diversified portfolio - but that time is not now and that place is not here. If you are interested in the general consensus of this sub on investing, I would urge you to consult the wiki while keeping in mind the general flowchart outlining basic steps to get your finances in order.
Finally, please note that this thread attempts to provide information about your tax obligations as defined by United States law (and interpreted by the IRS under the direction of the Treasury Department). I understand that a certain portion of the crypto community tends to view crypto as "tax free" due to the (actual and perceived) difficulty for the IRS to "know" about the transactions involved. I will not discuss unlawfully concealing crypto gains here nor will I suggest illegal tax avoidance activities.
The Basics
This section is best for people that don't understand much about taxes. It covers some very basic tax principles. It also assumes that all you did during the year was buy/sell a single crypto currency.
Fundamentally, the IRS treats crypto not as money, but as an asset (investment). While there are a few specific "twists" when it comes to crypto, when in doubt replace the word "crypto" with the word "stock" and you will get a pretty good idea how you should report and pay tax on crypto.
The first thing you should know is that the majority of this discussion applies to the taxes you are currently working on (2017 taxes). The tax bill that just passed applies to 2018 taxes (with a few very tiny exceptions), which most people will file in early 2019.
In general, you don't have to report or pay taxes on crypto currency holdings until you "cash out" all or part of your holdings. For now, I'm going to assume that you cash out by selling them for USD; however, other forms of cashing out will be covered later.
When you sell crypto, you report the difference between your basis (purchase price) and proceeds (sale price) on Schedule D. Your purchase price is commonly referred to as your basis; while the two terms don't mean exactly the same thing, they are pretty close to one another (in particular, there are three two ways to calculate your basis - your average cost, a first-in, first-out method, and a "specific identification" method. See more about these here and here). EDIT - you may not use average cost method with crypto - see here. If you sell at a gain, this gain increases your tax liability; if you sell at a loss, this loss decreases your tax liability (in most cases). If you sell multiple times during the year, you report each transaction separately (bad news if you trade often) but get to lump all your gains/losses together when determining how the trades impact your income.
One important thing to remember is that there are two different types of gains/losses from investments - short term gains (if you held an asset for one year or less) and long term gains (over one year; i.e. one year and one day). Short term gains are taxed at your marginal income rate (basically, just like if you had earned that money at a job) while long term gains are taxed at lower rates.
For most people, long term capital gains are taxed at 15%. However, if you are in the 10% or 15% tax bracket, congrats - your gains (up to the maximum amount of "unused space" in your bracket) are tax free! If you are in the 25%, 28%, 33%, or 35% bracket, long term gains are taxed at 15%. If you are in the 39.6% bracket, long term gains are taxed at 20%. Additionally, there is an "extra" 3.8% tax that applies to gains for those above $200,000/$250,000 (single/married). The exact computation of this tax is a little complicated, but if you are close to the $200,000 level, just know that it exists.
Finally, you should know that I'm assuming that you should treat your crypto gains/losses as investment gains/losses. I'm sure some people will try and argue that they are really "day traders" of crypto and trade as a full time job. While this is possible, the vast majority of people don't qualify for this status and you should really think several times before deciding you want to try that approach on the IRS.
"Cashing Out" - Trading Crypto for Goods/Services
I realize that not everyone that "cashes out" of crypto does so by selling it for USD. In fact, I understand that some in the crypto community view the necessity of cashing out itself as a type of myth. In this section, I discuss what happens if you trade your crypto for basically anything that isn't cash (minor sidenote - see next section for a special discussion on trading crypto for crypto; i.e. buying altcoins with crypto).
The IRS views trading crypto for something of value as a type of bartering that must be included in income. From the IRS's perspective, it doesn't matter if you sold crypto for cash and bought a car with that cash or if you just traded crypto directly for the car - in both cases, the IRS views you as having sold your crypto. This approach isn't unique to crypto - it works the same way if you trade stock for something.
This means that if you do trade your crypto for "stuff", you have to report every exchange as a sale of your crypto and calculate the gain/loss on that sale, just as if you had sold the crypto for cash.
Finally, there is one important exception to this rule. If you give your crypto away to charity (one recognized by the IRS; like a 501(c)(3) organization), the IRS doesn't make you report/pay any capital gains on the transaction. Additionally, you still get to deduct the value of your donation on the date it was made. Now, from a "selfish" point of view, you will always end up with more money if you sell the crypto, pay the tax, and keep the rest. But, if you are going to make a donation anyway, especially a large one, giving crypto where you have a big unrealized/untaxed gain is a very efficient way of doing so.
"Alt Coins" - Buying Crypto with Crypto
The previous section discusses what happens when you trade crypto for stuff. However, one thing that surprises many people is that trading crypto for crypto is also a taxable event, just like trading crypto for a car. Whether you agree with this position or not, it makes a lot of sense once you realize that the IRS doesn't view crypto as money, but instead as an asset. So to the IRS, trading bitcoin for ripple isn't like trading dollars for euros, but it is instead like trading shares of Apple stock for shares of Tesla stock.
Practically, what this means is that if you trade one crypto for another crypto (say BTC for XRP just to illustrate the point), the IRS views you as doing the following:
  • Selling for cash the amount of BTC you actually traded for XRP.
  • Owing capital gains/losses on the BTC based on its selling price (the fair market value at the moment of the exchange) and your purchase price (basis).
  • Buying a new investment (XRP) with a cost basis equal to the amount the BTC was worth when you exchanged them.
This means that if you "time" your trade wrong and the value of XRP goes down after you make the exchange, you still owe tax on your BTC gain even though you subsequently lost money. The one good piece of news in this is that when/if you sell your XRP (or change it back to BTC), you will get a capital loss for the value that XRP dropped.
There is one final point worth discussing in this section - the so called "like kind exchange" rules (aka section 1031 exchange). At a high level, these rules say that you can "swap" property with someone else without having to pay taxes on the exchange as long as you get property in return that is "like kind". Typically, these rules are used in real estate transactions. However, they can also apply to other types of transactions as well.
While the idea is simple (and makes it sound like crypto for crypto should qualify), the exact rules/details of this exception are very fact specific. Most experts (including myself, but certainly not calling myself an expert) believe that a crypto for crypto swap is not a like kind exchange. The recently passed tax bill also explicitly clarifies this issue - starting in 2018, only real estate qualifies for like kind exchange treatment. So, basically, the vast majority of evidence suggests that you can't use this "loophole" for 2017; however, there is a small minority view/some small amount of belief that this treatment would work for 2017 taxes and it is worth noting that I'm unaware of any court cases directly testing this approach.
Dealing with "Forks"
Perhaps another unpleasant surprise for crypto holders is that "forks" to create a new crypto also very likely generate a taxable event. The IRS has long (since at least the 1960s) held that "found" money is a taxable event. This approach has been litigated in court and courts have consistently upheld this position; it even has its own cool nerdy tax name - the "treasure trove" doctrine.
Practically, what this means is that if you owned BTC and it "forked" to create BCH, then the fair market value of the BCH you received is considered a "treasure trove" that must be reported as income (ordinary income - no capital gain rates). This is true whether or not you sold your BCH; if you got BCH from a fork, that is a taxable event (note - I'll continue using BTC forking to BCH in this section as an example, but the logic applies to all forks).
While everything I've discussed up to this point is pretty clearly established tax law, forks are really where things get messy with taxes. Thus, the remainder of this section contains more speculation than elsewhere in this post - the truth is that while the idea is simple (fork = free money = taxable), the details are messy and other kinds of tax treatment might apply to forks.
One basic practical problem with forks is that the new currency doesn't necessarily start trading immediately. Thus, you may have received BCH before there was a clear price or market for it. Basically, you owe tax on the value of BCH when you received it, but it isn't completely clear what that value was. There are several ways you can handle this; I'll list them in order from most accurate to least accurate (but note that this is just my personal view and there is ongoing disagreement on this issue with little/no authoritative guidance).
  • Use a futures market to determine the value of the BCH - if reliable sources published realistic estimates of what BCH will trade for in the future once trading begins, use this estimate as the value of your BCH. Pros/cons - futures markets are, in theory, pretty accurate. However, if they are volatile/subject to manipulation, they may provide an incorrect estimate of the true value of BCH. It would suck to use the first futures value published only to have that value plummet shortly thereafter, leaving you to pay ordinary income tax but only have an unrealized capital loss.
  • Wait until an exchange starts trading BCH; use the actual ("spot" price) as the value. Pros/cons - spot prices certainly reflect what you could have sold BCH for; however, it is possible that the true value of the coin was highelower when you received it as compared to when it started trading on the exchange. Thus this method seems less accurate to me than a futures based approach, but it is still certainly fairly reasonable.
  • Assume that the value is $0. This is my least preferred option, but there is still a case to be made for it. If you receive something that you didn't want, can't access, can't sell, and might fail, does it have any value? I believe the answer is yes (maybe not value it perfectly, but value it somewhat accurately), but if you honestly think the answer is no, then the correct tax answer would be to report $0 in income from the fork. The IRS would be most likely to disagree with this approach, especially since it results in the least amount of income reported for the current year (and the most favorable rates going forward). Accordingly, if you go this route, make extra sure you understand what it entails.
Note, once you've decided what to report as taxable income, this amount also becomes your cost basis in the new crypto (BCH). Thus, when you ultimately sell your BCH (or trade it for something else as described above), you calculate your gain/loss based on what you included in taxable income from the fork.
Finally, there is one more approach to dealing with forks worth mentioning. A fork "feels" a lot like a dividend - because you held BTC, you get BCH. In a stock world, if I get a cash dividend because I own the stock, that money is not treated as a "treasure trove" and subject to ordinary income rates - in most cases, it is a qualified dividend and subject to capital gain rates; in some cases, some types of stock dividends are completely non taxable. This article discusses this idea in slightly more detail and generally concludes that forks should not be treated as a dividend. Still, I would note that I'm unaware of any court cases directly testing this theory.
Ultimately, this post is supposed to be practical, so let me make sure to leave you with two key thoughts about the taxation of forks. First, I believe that the majority of evidence suggests that forks should be treated as a "treasure trove" and reported as ordinary income based on their value at creation and that this is certainly the "safest" option. Second, out of everything discussed in this post, I also believe that the correct taxation of forks is the murkiest and most "up for debate" area. If you are interested in a more detailed discussion of forks, see this thread for a previous version of this post discussing it at even more length and the comments for a discussion of this with the tax community.
Mining Crypto
Successfully mining crypto coins is a taxable event. Depending on the amount of effort you put into mining, it is either considered a hobby or a self-employment (business) activity. The IRS provides the following list of questions to help decide the correct classification:
  • The manner in which the taxpayer carries on the activity.
  • The expertise of the taxpayer or his advisors.
  • The time and effort expended by the taxpayer in carrying on the activity.
  • Expectation that assets used in activity may appreciate in value.
  • The success of the taxpayer in carrying on other similar or dissimilar activities.
  • The taxpayer’s history of income or losses with respect to the activity.
  • The amount of occasional profits, if any, which are earned.
If this still sounds complicated, that's because the distinction is subject to some amount of interpretation. As a rule of thumb, randomly mining crypto on an old computer is probably a hobby; mining full time on a custom rig is probably a business.
In either event, you must include in income the fair market value of any coins you successfully mine. These are ordinary income and your basis in these coins is their fair market value on the date they were mined. If your mining is a hobby, they go on line 21 (other income) and any expenses directly associated with mining go on schedule A (miscellaneous subject to 2% of AGI limitation). If your mining is a business, income and expenses go on schedule C.
Both approaches have pros and cons - hobby income isn't subject to the 15.3% self-employment tax, only normal income tax, but you get fewer deductions against your income and the deductions you get are less valuable. Business income has more deductions available, but you have to pay payroll (self-employment) tax of about 15.3% in addition to normal income tax.
What if I didn't keep good records? Do I really have to report every transaction?
One nice thing about the IRS treating crypto as an asset is that we can look at how the IRS treats people that "day trade" stock and often don't keep great records/have lots of transactions. While you need to be as accurate as possible, it is ok to estimate a little bit if you don't have exact records (especially concerning your cost basis). You need to put in some effort (research historical prices, etc...) and be reasonable, but the IRS would much rather you do a little bit of reasonable estimation as opposed to just not reporting anything. Sure, they might decide to audit you/disagree with some specifics, but you earn yourself a lot of credit if you can show that you honestly did the best you reasonably could and are making efforts to improve going forward.
However, concerning reporting every transaction - yes, sorry, it is clear that you have to do this, even if you made hundreds or thousands of them. Stock traders have had to go through this for many decades, and there is absolutely no reason to believe that the IRS would accept anything less from the crypto community. If you have the records or have any reasonable way of obtaining records/estimating them, you must report every transaction.
What if I don't trust you?
Well, first let me say that I can't believe you made it all the way down here to this section. Thanks for giving me an honest hearing. I would strongly encourage you to go read other well-written, honest guides. I'll link to some I like (both more technical IRS type guides and more crypto community driven guides). While a certain portion of the crypto community seems to view one of the benefits of crypto as avoiding all government regulation (including taxes), I've been pleasantly surprised to find that many crypto forums contain well reasoned, accurate tax guides. While I may not agree with 100% of their conclusions, that likely reflects true uncertainty around tax law that is fundamentally complex rather than an attempt on either end to help individuals unlawfully avoid taxes.
IRS guides
Non-IRS guides
submitted by Mrme487 to personalfinance [link] [comments]

Summary of the new IRS guidance

Link: https://bitcoin.tax/blog/irs-crypto-tax-faq/
The IRS has issued their long-awaited guidance on the tax treatment for cryptocurrencies. You can read their FAQ On Virtual Currency Transactions on the IRS website.
This is the first official guidance since the original 2014-21 notice in April 2014.

tl:dr;


Generally, this is the same as the advice and common practice used by taxpayers and accountants. Although, the exception here is the clarification of the specific identification rule. We'll talk about that below.

IRS Cryptocurrency Tax FAQ

We have gone into more detail for some of the main points in their FAQ.

Hard forks and airdrops

Despite peculiar wording by the IRS, they have confirmed that receipt of crypto from an airdrop or fork is to be treated as income, and so subject to income tax.
ordinary income equal to the fair market value of the new cryptocurrency when it is received, which is when the transaction is recorded on the distributed ledger, provided you have dominion and control over the cryptocurrency so that you can transfer, sell, exchange, or otherwise dispose of the cryptocurrency
However, these drops typically have no market (perhaps a futures market) until they have existed for a period of time, so establishing a value could be difficult. It is possible that the value could be zero right at that exact moment it is recorded on the distributed ledger.
In order to receive income, you must have dominion and control over these new crypto. This effectively means you must be able to manage it; typically you would have the private keys or it is immediately available in a custodial wallet or online account, e.g. Coinbase.
If the crypto doesn't appear in your wallet, or you don't get control of it until a later date, then that later date is used to calculated the USD income value.
This had been a common question among crypto traders: if BTC was forked off into a new "BTC" coin, which you might not even have been aware of, do you still have income? The answer is no. Unless, you subsequently get access to those new coins, in which case you do have income on the date you receive control.
When you have income for an airdrop or fork, this also sets the cost basis (value and date) for any subsequent capital gains calculations.
Bitcoin.Tax already looks up any current value, if known, for forks or airdrop symbols when they are added to the Income tab, otherwise a zero basis is used.

Fair Market Value (FMV)

FMV is used to give something a value, i.e. what it's worth. If you list a bike for sale, you might research the prices for which other people are selling. Those prices give a FMV. But it you sell your bike and someone buys it for $100, then the bike's FMV was $100.
With crypto, sometimes we need to know FMV because we are not trading directly for dollars.
For example, if you sell 1 BTC for 150 LTC, you are disposing of the 1 BTC at FMV. You need to know the USD value in order to know the proceeds and to calculate any capital gains or losses.
So, first, if this was traded on an exchange, we use the spot price on the exchange at that time. This is true even if the transaction was off-chain.
However, where no FMV exists, such as a peer-to-peer transaction, then you have to get the value from elsewhere.
So, secondly, use the FMV of the service or product you are exchanging. With the above bike example, say buying it with crypto, the FMV would be that of the bike itself (the price it would have sold for USD).
Lastly, when no value can be obtained, then use a service that provides a consistent worldwide indices value (the IRS are calling this an "explorer" but that is a confusing term as blockchain explorers may not provide a USD value). If you do not use an "explorer" value, you can use an "accurate representation of the cryptocurrency's market value". Much like with fiat, this means using an establish and consistent source.
Bitcoin.Tax already uses the exchange price data wherever possible, but otherwise combines crypto pricing for multiple worldwide sources to calculate a FMV.

FIFO and Specific Identification

Advice from most tax preparers and accountants has been to err on the side of caution and go with First-In First-Out (FIFO). Basically, if you bought 1 BTC for $9,000 and later another for $10,000, when you come to sell 1 BTC (or partial) you would use the cost of the first 1 BTC that you had acquired.
This is the default IRS cost basis method and would not be challenged.
Some taxpayers had filed using specific identification, where FIFO was not used and instead the "lot" that was sold was chosen from their wallets. Summary strategies could also be employed, such as Last-In Last-Out (LIFO), where the basis of the most recently acquired crypto is used instead.
These other strategies, such as last-in first-out, closest-cost or lowest-cost, often try to minimize the gains per transaction and defer them until later.
This is the biggest change in the new IRS guidance and confirms that specific identification can be used. However, you must be able to document this, which the IRS describes as:
You may identify a specific unit of virtual currency either by documenting the specific unit’s unique digital identifier such as a private key, public key, and address, or by records showing the transaction information for all units of a specific virtual currency, such as Bitcoin, held in a single account, wallet, or address. This information must show (1) the date and time each unit was acquired, (2) your basis and the fair market value of each unit at the time it was acquired, (3) the date and time each unit was sold, exchanged, or otherwise disposed of, and (4) the fair market value of each unit when sold, exchanged, or disposed of, and the amount of money or the value of property received for each unit.
There is no guidance if any extra information should be reported, but it is generally the same information that is added to the 8949 form where capital gains are reported.
Bitcoin.Tax already provides automatic calculations using multiple specific identification strategies so you can choose your cost basis lots. Navigate to the Calculate tab and you can see the values for each crypto you have traded.

Gifts and Donations

Similar to gifts of stocks or property, the rules regarding cost basis have remained unchanged. Received gifts are not immediate income but you do still recognize an capital gains income when you later come to sell, exchange or dispose of the cryptocurrency.
You can use the original basis (with documentation) from the giver in order to make use of long-term gains. However, your received basis becomes the lesser of the giver's cost basis and the FMV of the gift on the date you received it. This is to prevent from gifting losses. Also, if you do not have documentation showing the gift cost basis, then your basis is zero, i.e. you must declare 100% as capital gains.
Donations to registered charities do not recognize income, gains or losses. The value of your charitable donation is the FMV on the date of the gift if you have held the crypto for more than a year. For a year or less, it is lesser of the crypto's cost basis or its FMV on the day of the gift.
Bitcoin.Tax reports already splits out the basis for any gifts or donations that you make, which can be given to the recipient to provide them with the information they will require.

What was not mentioned

There are still some key questions and ambiguities that tax professionals have been looking for clarification. For instance, with hard forks and airdrops, if you have the private keys but no software, does that count as control?
Airdrop and forks generally have no markets when they are created, so is there a zero FMV? And should you take the value only when you exercise control?
Can specific identification be used at will or must it be done consistently?
Were 1031 "like-kind" exchanges ever a valid approach before 2018?

Guidance is retroactive

Finally, be aware that IRS guidance is always retroactive, unless otherwise stated, and so should be applied to past and future crypto transactions. If you have not followed these rules then you should consult with your tax professional and may need to file an amendment.
submitted by Sal-BitcoinTax to bitcointaxes [link] [comments]

03-27 13:34 - 'AiOption (AiOption) receives tens of millions of dollars in financing to help the blockchain empower the financial industry' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/jackzhang0 removed from /r/Bitcoin within 3-13min

'''
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[link]1
This round of financing will help the platform to further strengthen the innovation and research and development of original key core technologies, consolidate the company's leading edge in the binary options industry of the blockchain, and help the company continue to expand more application scenarios and accelerate the blockchain's empowerment of the financial industry. In order to further improve the product experience, we will also introduce local special versions based on user habits in different countries and regions. As soon as it entered the promotion in the Asia-Pacific region in 2020, there were more than 100,000 registered users in the first week, achieving very good results. The platform will also launch more promotion activities in combination with local characteristics. The top investment groups such as the Thai Royal Family and the Japanese Consortium gave AiOption a high rating. It is indeed a black technology star product known as Israeli fintech innovation.
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[link]2
Safe, efficient, and high-performance systems
AiOption has top risk control, anti-fraud and segregated witness technologies, comprehensively formulates a security policy system, multi-level risk identification control, and multiple security defense methods. The high-frequency transaction matching engine steadily supports large amounts of data, high performance, and high concurrency. It adopts a distributed architecture, and the market and deep data come online at a fast speed. The front-end adopts a firewall anti-attack mechanism and the back-end adopts a hidden and discrete deployment.
AiOption's binary options trading system is equipped with flexible and convenient trading modes and an extremely secure system to ensure the safety of user assets.
Fair and simple, simple and convenient transaction model
On a general options platform, the bet price is real-time Bitcoin price and can be easily manipulated by the platform. When the player wagers the Bitcoin price on the platform, the wager price is the initial Bitcoin price for each round of the game, and manipulation is not allowed! Ensure fair and fair transactions, convenient user transactions, and easy to master gameplay.
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'''
AiOption (AiOption) receives tens of millions of dollars in financing to help the blockchain empower the financial industry
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Author: jackzhang0
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US Tax Guide for ETH and other cryptocurrencies

Introduction:  
Greetings, fellow ethtraders! Happy New Year! In the next few months, taxpayers across the US will be filing their 2017 tax returns. As an Enrolled Agent and a ETH/cryptocurrency investor and enthusiast, I wanted to write up a brief guide on how your investments in ETH and other cryptocurrencies are taxed in the US.
 
 
1. Are ETH/cryptocurrency realized gains taxable?
Yes. The IRS treats virtual currency (such as cryptocurrency) as property. That means if you sell ETH, BTC, or any other cryptocurrency that has appreciated in value, you have realized a capital gain and must pay taxes on this income. If you held the position for one year or less, it is a short-term capital gain which is taxed at your ordinary income tax rate. If you held the position for more than one year, it is a long-term capital gain which is taxed at your long-term capital gains tax rate. In most cases, this is 15%, but could also be 0% or 20% depending on your specific ordinary income tax bracket.
 
2. If I sell my ETH for USD on Coinbase but do not transfer the USD from Coinbase to my bank account, am I still taxed?
Yes. The only thing that matters is that you sold the ETH, which creates a taxable transaction. Whether you transfer the USD to your bank account or not does not matter.
 
3. If I use my ETH to buy OMG or another cryptocurrency, is this a taxable transaction?
Most likely yes. See #4 below for a more detailed explanation. If assuming crypto to crypto trades are not able to be like-kind exchanged, then continue on to the next paragraph here.
This is actually two different transactions. The first transaction is selling your ETH for USD. The second transaction is buying the OMG with your USD. You must manually calculate these amounts. For example, I buy 1 ETH for $600 on Coinbase. Later on, the price of 1 ETH rises to $700. I transfer that 1 ETH to Bittrex and use it to buy 37 OMG. I have to report a capital gain of $100 because of this transaction. My total cost basis for the 37 OMG I purchased is $700.
 
4. If I use my ETH to buy OMG or other cryptocurrency, could that be considered a tax-free like-kind exchange?
Probably not. The new tax law says that like-kind exchanges only pertain to real estate transactions. This was done with Section 13303, which replaced “property” with “real property” for all of Section 1031 (page 72 near the bottom). My personal interpretation:
In 2018 and going forward, cryptocurrencies can definitely not be like-kind exchanged.
In 2017 and before, it is a very gray area. I personally am not taking the position that they can be like-kind exchanged, because if the IRS went after a taxpayer who did this, the IRS would probably win and the taxpayer would owe taxes, interest, and probably penalties on every single little gain made from trading one cryptocurrency for another.
Here is a great interpretation of why trading cryptocurrency for cryptocurrency is probably not a like-kind transaction.
In my opinion, the biggest factor is that like-kind exchanges must be reported on Form 8824 and not just ignored. Therefore, if a taxpayer is claiming like-kind exchanges on crypto to crypto exchanges, he or she would have to fill out a Form 8824 for each individual transaction of crypto to crypto, which would be absolutely cumbersome if there are hundreds or thousands of such trades.
Here is another article about like-kind exchanges.
Here is the American Institute of CPAs' letter to the IRS, dated June 10, 2016, asking them to release guidance on whether crypto to crypto can be like-kind exchanged or not. The IRS has not responded to the letter.
 
5. How do I calculate the realized capital gain or loss on the sale of my cryptocurrency?
The realized gain or loss is your total proceeds from the sale minus what you purchased those positions for (your cost basis). For example, you bought 1 ETH for $300 in June of 2017. In December of 2017, you sold that 1 ETH for $800. Your realized gain would be $800 - $300 = $500. Since you held it for one year or less, the $500 would be a short-term capital gain taxed at your ordinary income tax rate.
 
6. Which ETH's cost basis do I use if I have multiple purchases?
The cost basis reporting method is up to you. For example, I buy my first ETH at $300, a second ETH at $530, and a third ETH at $400. Later on, I sell one ETH for $800. I can use:
FIFO (first in first out) - cost basis would the first ETH, $300, which would result in a gain of $500.
LIFO (last in first out) - cost basis would be the third ETH, $400, which would result in a gain of $400.
Average cost - cost basis would be the average of the three ETH, $410, which would result in a gain of $390.
Specific identification - I can just choose which coin's cost basis to use. For example, I can choose the second ETH's cost basis, $530, which would result in the lowest capital gains possible of $270.
 
7. If I end up with a net capital loss, can I claim this on my tax return?
Capital gains and capital losses are netted on your tax return. If the net result of this is a capital loss, you may offset it against ordinary income on your tax return, but only at a maximum of $3,000 per year. The remaining losses are carried forward until you use them up.
 
8. What is the tax rate on my capital gains?
If long-term, the tax rate is 0%, 15%, or 20%, depending on your ordinary income tax bracket. If short-term, the tax bracket you’ll be in will depend on your total income and deductions. The ordinary income tax brackets are 10%, 15%, 25%, 28%, 33%, 35%, and 39.6% in 2017 and 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35%, and 37% in 2018 and going forward.
Here are the 2017 and 2018 ordinary income tax brackets.
Here are the 2017 and 2018 long-term capital gains tax brackets.
Here is a detailed article on how the calculation of long-term capital gains tax work and how you can take advantage of the 0% long-term capital gains rate, if applicable.
 
9. If I mine ETH or any other cryptocurrency, is this taxable?
Yes. IRS Notice 2014-21 states that mining cryptocurrency is taxable. For example, if you mined $7,000 worth of ETH in 2017, you must report $7,000 of income on your 2017 tax return. For many taxpayers, this will be reported on your Schedule C, and you will most likely owe self-employment taxes on this income as well. The $7,000 becomes the cost basis in your ETH position.
 
10. How do I calculate income for the cryptocurrency I mined?
This is the approach I would take. Say I mined 1 ETH on December 31, 2017. I would look up the daily historical prices for ETH and average the high and low prices for ETH on December 31, 2017, which is ($760.35 + $710.12) / 2 = $735.24. I would report $735.24 of income on my tax return. This would also be the cost basis of the 1 ETH I mined.
 
11. Can I deduct mining expenses on my tax return?
If you are reporting the income from mining on Schedule C, then you can deduct expenses on Schedule C as well. You can deduct the portion of your electricity costs allocated to mining, and then you depreciate the cost of your mining rig over time (probably over five years). Section 179 also allows for the full deduction of the cost of certain equipment in year 1, so you could choose to do that if you wanted to instead.
 
12. If I receive ETH or other cryptocurrency as a payment for my business, is this taxable?
Yes. Similar to mining, your income would be what the value of the coins you received was. This would also be your cost basis in the coins.
 
13. If I received Bitcoin Cash as a result of the hard fork on August 1, 2017, is this taxable?
Most likely yes. For example, if you owned 1 Bitcoin and received 1 Bitcoin Cash on August 1, 2017 as a result of the hard fork, your income would be the value of 1 Bitcoin Cash on that date. Bitcoin.tax uses a value of $277. This value would also be your cost basis in the position. Any other hard forks would probably be treated similarly. Airdrops may be treated similarly as well, in the IRS' view.
Here are a couple more good articles about reporting the Bitcoin Cash fork as taxable ordinary income. The second one goes into depth and cites a US Supreme Court decision as precedent: one, two
 
14. If I use ETH, BTC, or other cryptocurrency to purchase goods or services, is this a taxable transaction?
Yes. It would be treated as selling your cryptocurrency for USD, and then using that USD to purchase those goods or services. This is because the IRS treats cryptocurrency as property and not currency.
 
15. Are cryptocurrencies subject to the wash sale rule?
Probably not. Section 1091 only applies to stock or securities. Cryptocurrencies are not classified as stocks or securities. Therefore, you could sell your ETH at a loss, repurchase it immediately, and still realize this loss on your tax return, whereas you cannot do the same with a stock. Please see this link for more information.
 
16. What if I hold cryptocurrency on an exchange based outside of the US?
There are two separate foreign account reporting requirements: FBAR and FATCA.
A FBAR must be filed if you held more than $10,000 on an exchange based outside of the US at any point during the tax year.
A Form 8938 (FATCA) must be filed if you held more than $75,000 on an exchange based outside of the US at any point during the tax year, or more than $50,000 on the last day of the tax year.
The penalties are severe for not filing these two forms if you are required to. Please see the second half of this post for more information on foreign account reporting.
 
17. What are the tax implications of gifting cryptocurrency?
Small gifts of cryptocurrency do not have a tax implication for the gift giver or for the recipient. The recipient would retain the gift giver's old cost basis, so it could be a good idea for the gift giver to provide records of the original cost basis to the recipient as well (or else the recipient would have to assume a cost basis of $0 if the recipient ever sells the cryptocurrency).
Large gifts of cryptocurrency could start having gift and estate tax implications on the giver if the value exceeds more than $14,000 (in 2017) or $15,000 (in 2018) per year per recipient.
Here's a good article on Investopedia on this issue.
An important exception applies if the gift giver gives cryptocurrency that has a cost basis that is higher than the market value at the time of the gift. Please see the middle of this post for more information on that.
 
18. Where can I learn even more about cryptocurrency taxation?
Unchained Podcast: The Tax Rules That Have Crypto Users Aghast
IRS Notice 2014-21
Great reddit post from tax attorney Tyson Cross from 2014
 
19. Are there any websites that you recommend in helping me with all of this?
Yes - I have used bitcoin.tax and highly recommend it. You can import directly from an exchange to the website using API, and/or export a .csv/excel file from the exchange and import it into the website. The exchanges I successfully imported from were Coinbase, GDAX, Bittrex, and Binance. The result is a .csv or other file that you can import into your tax software.
I have also heard good things about cointracking.info but have not personally used it myself.
 
20. Taxation is theft!
I can't help you there.
 
 
That is the summary I have for now. There have been a lot of excellent cryptocurrency tax guides on reddit, such as this one, this one, and this one, but I wanted to post my short summary guide on ethtrader which hopefully answers some of the questions you all may have about US taxation of ETH and other cryptocurrencies. Please let me know if you have any more questions, and I’d be happy to answer them to the best of my ability. Thank you!
Regarding edits: I have made many edits to my post since I originally posted it. Please refresh to see the latest edits to my guide. Thank you.
 
Disclaimer:
The information contained within this post is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to substitute for obtaining tax, accounting, or financial advice from a professional.
Any U.S. federal tax advice contained in this post is not intended to be used for the purpose of avoiding penalties under U.S. federal tax law.
Presentation of the information via the Internet is not intended to create, and receipt does not constitute, an advisor-client relationship. Internet users are advised not to act upon this information without seeking the service of a tax professional.
submitted by Nubboi to ethtrader [link] [comments]

Please help an old man buy some bitcoin for his grandson. Details inside.

Hello,
I have told each of my six grandchildren that I will pay their way through college. My youngest grandson has decided not to go to college, though, and has asked instead for the money in bitcoins. He is on a mission trip for the next 6 months and is not reachable otherwise I would ask for his help. I want to surprise him with his bitcoins when he returns.
Can you help an old man buy some bitcoins for his grandson? Where is the safest place to buy them and how do I store them until I am ready to transfer them to my grandson.
Over and out, Rich
submitted by wunderbaah to btc [link] [comments]

Earn up to £90 ($116) with Coinbase and Blockchain (Quiz Answered Included)

Includes all Quiz Answers.
There are 4 different opportunities to earn free money from Coinbase,

**Stellar Lumens, earn up to $50**:**** Using the link below you will be given a chance to earn $10-$50 USD in Stellar Lumens (XLM) from Coinbase. Just watch a few couple minute videos and each video awards money. Then share your link in this post and help up to 4 other people gain Stellar Lumens. After watching the videos you can sell it for Bitcoin or directly for USD. If you link your PayPal account you can even withdraw the money to your bank.

Link: https://www.coinbase.com/join/5ce608fb5bf6e402de175b00

*\*Quiz Answers:*\*
  1. Stellar is a decentralized coin that unites currencies
  2. Facilitating low cost universal payments
  3. Fast, secure, and global
  4. To issue and exchange tokens quickly
  5. It relies on the cooperation of trusted nodes

*\*Still hungry for more free money?*\* After completing the Stellar Lumens (XLM) videos, you can earn even more free money from Coinbase by watching videos for ZEC, BAT, and ZRX. The amount for these varies, but they can all be sold for USD or Bitcoin.

*\*Zcash (ZEC)*\* is giving $3. Link: https://www.coinbase.com/earn/zcash/
ZCash Answers:
  1. A privacy protecting crypto
  2. It keeps your financial info safe so it can not be sold
  3. Through a cryptographic breakthrough known as zero-knowledge proof

*\*Basic Attention Token (BAT)*\* is giving $10. Link: https://www.coinbase.com/earn/basic-attention-token/
BAT Answers:
  1. There are too many ads and data trackers
  2. It is free, open source web browser built for privacy
  3. Users get paid BAT for viewing opt-in ads, and publishers get rewarded when users pay attention to their content

*\*0x (ZRX)*\* is giving $3. Link: https://www.coinbase.com/earn/0x/
0x Answers:
  1. To create a tokenized world, through friction less, peer-to-peer exchange of tokens
  2. A new way to trade tokens and cryptocurrencies with other people.
  3. It can be used to pay relayer fees and and participate in protocol upgrades in the future


Blockchain.com is giving out £30 ($50) worth of XLM for registering with them. The site requires you to add identification, but the site is trustworthy and has been around for a long time.

Link: https://www.blockchain.com/getcrypto
submitted by ItzDowny to beermoneyuk [link] [comments]

Coinbase  How To Send / Receive Bitcoin! How to buy bitcoins in Coinbase Brian Armstrong Interview: Coinbase News, Bitcoin Price ... How To Signup at Coinbase and Purchase Bitcoin How To Send And Receive Bitcoin With Coinbase!

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Coinbase How To Send / Receive Bitcoin!

Brian Armstrong [Coinbase CEO]: In this live stream, we will discuss Coinbase news, Bitcoin, Cryptocurrencies, Investments, Trading, World Crisis such as Cor... This video shows you how to sign up for coinbase and how to verify your account. Purchase at least $100 or more worth of bitcoin and get $10 worth free. Simply click here Coinbase provides the purchase and sale of Bitcoins and security in their transfers and protection of their bitcoins. LINKS USED ON VIDEO CoinBase - https://goo.gl/Kxqpfn BITCOIN PORTFOLIO USED 1 ... This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue. Watch Queue Queue This is a short video showing you how you would send a receive crypto currencies to and from different wallets! hope you enjoy and feel free to check my links out I would appreciate it! By signing ...

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